Essay Rubrics To Print

How To Use The 5 Best Free Rubric Making Tools For Teachers

Editor's note: We have originally written and published this article in January 2014. Thanks to your useful suggestions and our own following of the latest developments in the fast paced field of technology, we have updated this piece in November 2015 in the hope that you will keep finding it useful. Thank you for sharing! 

  1. Annenberg Learner
    • About Annenberg Learner:
      Annenberg Learner is a tool that allows teachers to specify the appearance of their rubric and the criteria on which students will be graded. The service then creates a rubric based on those specifications for educators to use.
    • How To Use Annenberg Learner:
      Click the link above to go to the Annenberg Learner page. Once there, click the bold “Build a Rubric” text in the middle of the page. On the next page, specify the title of the rubric and your name, and then click “Next”. Now choose whether you want your rubric to be in a table or list format and click “Next”. On Step 3, select the rating system for your rubric and click “Next”. For Step 4, determine how you would like your rating system to appear on your rubric. On the next page, determine the criteria that students will be graded on and click “Next”. For Step 6, decide how you would like these criteria to appear in your rubric and click “Next”. Your rubric is now complete! Annenberg Learner’s Build a Rubric system has created a rubric for you based on your own specifications. To view your rubric, click the “Completed Rubric” hyperlink on the Step 7 page.
  2. EssayTagger Common Core Rubric Creation Tool
    • About EssayTagger Common Core Rubric Creation Tool:
      The Essay Tagger Common Core Rubric creation tool is a service that allows teachers to simply and easily create rubrics based on Statewide Common Core Standards.
    • How To Use EssayTagger Common Core Rubric Creation Tool:
      Click the link above to visit the EssayTagger Common Core Rubric creation tool. Once there, click the “Begin” button at the bottom of the page. First, select the grade level of your rubric and click “Continue”. On the next page, determine the elements from the Common Core Standards that you would like students to be graded on and click “Continue”. On the next page, customize the Common Core elements you specified and click “Continue”. Now input the title of the rubric as well as your personal information and click “Create Rubric”. Now you are able to print, download or share your new Rubric!
  3. iRubric
    • About iRubric:
      iRubric is a service provided by Rcampus.com that allows users to create a rubric that they can save and edit at any time.
    • How To Use iRubric:
      Click the link above to visit the iRubric homepage. Once there, locate the hyperlink that reads, “Get started” directly below the slideshow and click it. You will now be taken to a signup page; designate which type of account you would like to create and click “Continue”. On the next page, enter your username, email address, and password and then move on to the next step. On the next page, you will enter your personal information and then click “Save”. After completing the signup process, you will be taken to a “Quick Links” page. Once here, locate the tab to the top right of the screen that reads “Rubrics” and click it. Select “Build” from the dropdown menu. To create a new rubric, select “Option A: Build From Scratch” and click “Start”. On your rubric creation page, first enter the title, description, keywords, and grade level of your rubric. Then select a primary subject and type. Scroll down to your rubric. In the first column, enter a title and categories on which students will be graded. In the remaining columns to the right of the screen, include the specifications for those categories. Add a level or column by clicking “Add Level or Column” to the right of the screen. Once you are done with your rubric, find the “This Rubric is:” heading and click “Ready to use”. Under “Gallery Viewing” decide whether or not you would like to keep your rubric private or open it for public viewing. When you are done, click “Save”. You will now be redirected to a page where you can decide if you would like to share your rubric, print it, or do a multitude of other things.
  4. RubiStar
    • About RubiStar:
      RubiStar is a simple and easily customizable rubric creation tool.
    • How To Use RubiStar:
      Click the link above to visit the RubiStar site. Once there, scroll down to the “Create a Rubric” heading and click the blue button for the subject that you would like to create a rubric for. RubiStar will now redirect you to a page with customizable rubric template to choose from. Choose the rubric template that is most similar to the assignment for which you are creating a rubric. You will now be redirected to the page where you will create your rubric. First include general information for the rubric, like your name, the name of the project, the zip code in which you are teaching, and whether or not this is a demonstration rubric. After specifying basic rubric info, you are able to begin customizing your rubric under the “Creating and Editing your Rubric” heading. Under the “Category” column, choose the categories on which students will be graded. In the remaining columns to the right of the “Category” column, include the specifications for student work that is below standards, approaches standards, meets standards, or is above standards; include scores if you wish. Once you are done customizing your rubric, click the “Submit” arrow at the bottom of the screen. RubiStar will now redirect you to a screen on which you are able to print, download, or make your rubric available online.
  5. Teachnology General Rubric Generator
    • About Technology General Rubric Generator:
      The Teachnology General Rubric Generator is a rubric generator that is incredibly easy to use and produces a rubric with a clean look.
    • How To Use Technology General Rubric Generator:
      Click the link above to visit the Teachnology General Rubric Generator. Once there, locate the text boxes under “Step #1: School, Title, and Teacher Name” and input the required information. Choose a picture for your rubric under “Step #2: Pick a Picture”. In “Step #3: Body of Rubric”, you will create the specifications for the assignment. In the text box next to the gray boxes that read “Stated Object or Performance Number”, input the category on which students will be graded. In the text boxes next to the blue boxes that read “(Beginning, Developing, Accomplished, or Mastery) Level of Performance for Objective #” input the specifications on which students will be graded. Once you are done editing your rubric, click “Generate-Rubric” at the bottom of the page. Teachnology will now provide you with a plain text version of your rubric that you are able to either print or copy and paste into a document or email.

Free Educational Technology

Now that you have the 5 best free Rubric making tools for teachers, there’s no reason not to utilize them in order to make grading every assignment easier!

How the SAT Essay Is Scored

Responses to the optional SAT Essay are scored using a carefully designed process.

  • Two different people will read and score your essay.
  • Each scorer awards 1–4 points for each dimension: reading, analysis, and writing.
  • The two scores for each dimension are added.
  • You’ll receive three scores for the SAT Essay—one for each dimension—ranging from 2–8 points.
  • There is no composite SAT Essay score (the three scores are not added together) and there are no percentiles.

We train every scorer to hold every student to the same standards, the ones shown on this page.

Quick Links

Reading Scoring Guide

Analysis Scoring Guide

Writing Scoring Guide

Score of 4

  • Demonstrates thorough comprehension of the source text.
  • Shows an understanding of the text’s central idea(s) and of most important details and how they interrelate, demonstrating a comprehensive understanding of the text.
  • Is free of errors of fact or interpretation with regard to the text.
  • Makes skillful use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating a complete understanding of the source text.

Score of 3

  • Demonstrates effective comprehension of the source text.
  • Shows an understanding of the text’s central idea(s) and important details.
  • Is free of substantive errors of fact and interpretation with regard to the text.
  • Makes appropriate use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating an understanding of the source text.

Score of 2

  • Demonstrates some comprehension of the source text.
  • Shows an understanding of the text’s central idea(s) but not of important details.
  • May contain errors of fact and/or interpretation with regard to the text.
  • Makes limited and/or haphazard use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating some understanding of the source text.

Score of 1

  • Demonstrates little or no comprehension of the source text.
  • Fails to show an understanding of the text’s central idea(s), and may include only details without reference to central idea(s).
  • May contain numerous errors of fact and/or interpretation with regard to the text.
  • Makes little or no use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating little or no understanding of the source text.

Score of 4

  • Offers an insightful analysis of the source text and demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of the analytical task.
  • Offers a thorough, well-considered evaluation of the author’s use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive elements, and/or feature(s) of the student’s own choosing.
  • Contains relevant, sufficient, and strategically chosen support for claim(s) or point(s) made.
  • Focuses consistently on those features of the text that are most relevant to addressing the task.

Score of 3

  • Offers an effective analysis of the source text and demonstrates an understanding of the analytical task.
  • Competently evaluates the author’s use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive elements, and/or feature(s) of the student’s own choosing.
  • Contains relevant and sufficient support for claim(s) or point(s) made.
  • Focuses primarily on those features of the text that are most relevant to addressing the task.

Score of 2

  • Offers limited analysis of the source text and demonstrates only partial understanding of the analytical task.
  • Identifies and attempts to describe the author’s use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive elements, and/or feature(s) of the student’s own choosing, but merely asserts rather than explains their importance, or one or more aspects of the response’s analysis are unwarranted based on the text.
  • Contains little or no support for claim(s) or point(s) made.
  • May lack a clear focus on those features of the text that are most relevant to addressing the task.

Score of 1

  • Offers little or no analysis or ineffective analysis of the source text and demonstrates little or no understanding of the analytic task.
  • Identifies without explanation some aspects of the author’s use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive elements, and/or feature(s) of the student’s choosing.
  • Or numerous aspects of the response’s analysis are unwarranted based on the text.
  • Contains little or no support for claim(s) or point(s) made, or support is largely irrelevant.
  • May not focus on features of the text that are relevant to addressing the task.
  • Or the response offers no discernible analysis (e.g., is largely or exclusively summary).

Score of 4

  • Is cohesive and demonstrates a highly effective use and command of language.
  • Includes a precise central claim.
  • Includes a skillful introduction and conclusion. The response demonstrates a deliberate and highly effective progression of ideas both within paragraphs and throughout the essay.
  • Has a wide variety in sentence structures. The response demonstrates a consistent use of precise word choice. The response maintains a formal style and objective tone.
  • Shows a strong command of the conventions of standard written English and is free or virtually free of errors.

Score of 3

  • Is mostly cohesive and demonstrates effective use and control of language.
  • Includes a central claim or implicit controlling idea.
  • Includes an effective introduction and conclusion. The response demonstrates a clear progression of ideas both within paragraphs and throughout the essay.
  • Has variety in sentence structures. The response demonstrates some precise word choice. The response maintains a formal style and objective tone.
  • Shows a good control of the conventions of standard written English and is free of significant errors that detract from the quality of writing.

Score of 2

  • Demonstrates little or no cohesion and limited skill in the use and control of language.
  • May lack a clear central claim or controlling idea or may deviate from the claim or idea over the course of the response.
  • May include an ineffective introduction and/or conclusion. The response may demonstrate some progression of ideas within paragraphs but not throughout the response.
  • Has limited variety in sentence structures; sentence structures may be repetitive.
  • Demonstrates general or vague word choice; word choice may be repetitive. The response may deviate noticeably from a formal style and objective tone.
  • Shows a limited control of the conventions of standard written English and contains errors that detract from the quality of writing and may impede understanding.

Score of 1

  • Demonstrates little or no cohesion and inadequate skill in the use and control of language.
  • May lack a clear central claim or controlling idea.
  • Lacks a recognizable introduction and conclusion. The response does not have a discernible progression of ideas.
  • Lacks variety in sentence structures; sentence structures may be repetitive. The response demonstrates general and vague word choice; word choice may be poor or inaccurate. The response may lack a formal style and objective tone.
  • Shows a weak control of the conventions of standard written English and may contain numerous errors that undermine the quality of writing.

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